able/disabled, health

TO BE SHOT? OR NOT?

As of 4/1/21, over 76 Million people have been fully vaccinated in the U.S.

                                    

For me, it was a no-brainer.

When the Salk vaccine to protect against polio was first released, my son received his injection at age four. About ten days after that, the nursery school he attended took the children on a field trip to the Los Angeles Music Center. This was during the 1950s when passengers were not required to wear seatbelts, so the little darlings piled into the car packed in like sardines.    

Approximately two weeks later, three of the nursery school children began exhibiting polio symptoms: fever, headache, neck stiffness, pain in the arms and legs, weakness, vomiting, PARALYSIS.  The nursery school shut down. Not only did the children become infected, but they also passed the virus on to siblings and parents. One victim was a father who had been a dentist. He recovered for a while but was severely affected and could no longer pursue his occupation. He succumbed to the after-effects at an early age.

One day, I accompanied a nursery school mom to visit her son at Rancho Los Amigos, a facility in Southern California that accommodated a large number of iron lungs. For me, it was chilling to see children’s faces protruding from these frightening-looking tanks. For the parents, it must have been devastating.

                   

Iron lungs helped patients breathe. They are now obsolete because world-wide polio has been almost eradicated. Today, ventilators are the go-to device for breathing assistance, especially common during this COVID-19 pandemic.

Meanwhile, our two nursery schoolteachers, who had been in such close contact with the children, felt especially vulnerable. After consulting with their doctors, they received large doses of gamma globulin. This was costly but health experts believed that gamma globulin boosted immune systems, and that might be one way to fight off this crippling disease. When the teachers submitted their medical bills to the nursery school parents, some parents balked at paying for the shots. I couldn’t believe it. These two women put their lives at risk in caring for our children. Why should any parent deny them this protection?

Even though my son had received the Salk vaccine less than ten days before the field trip, I believe that antibodies were already beginning to form in his body, and this spared him.

When I was growing up, poliomyelitis was the summer scourge, and no one could figure out how it was transmitted. Swimming pools were suspect because the numbers of infections rose during the summer. Consequently, public swimming pools shut down if one of the users came down with the disease.

At about 17, I met a boy a year or so older than me. I’ll call him Joe, and at that time he was on the rebound from a girlfriend named Betty. Joe and Betty had been childhood friends and during adolescence their friendship blossomed into romance. Now they had broken up.

Joe was a live wire, an identical twin with a dynamic personality. Not only that, but he and his brother sang together and often performed at social events. I fell for that, too. But not long after we began dating, Joe took a summer job as a counselor at a children’s camp. Unfortunately, several cases of polio broke out at the camp and everyone was placed under quarantine. Guess what? As fate would have it, Joe’s old girlfriend, Betty, was also a camp counselor at the same camp. During their confinement, their romance re-ignited, and he sent me the equivalent of a Dear John letter, and we would not be seeing each other again. I like to joke that after meeting me, Joe realized that Betty was the one for him. Eventually, they married.

I was crestfallen for a while, but not for too long. Yet whenever I think about polio, memories of my broken romance re-surface. More importantly, memories of the miracle accomplished by the Salk vaccine come to bear. That is why I was delighted to receive two doses of the Pfizer vaccine. After receiving each of the injections, I felt jubilant. Additionally, when my family recently celebrated Passover, a memorial to overcoming obstacles and enjoying freedom, we tied it to the COVID-19 vaccine. This vaccine has provided us with an opportunity for protection against the pandemic that has claimed more than half a million lives in the U.S. alone.    

I am also enthusiastic about taking any other vaccines that have the power to protect me from flu, shingles, pneumonia, tetanus. And why not? I am a believer in science.

Norine Dresser is a folklorist who, as a mom, was equally positive when she learned that her four grandchildren had been vaccinated against mumps, measles, chicken pox. These were damaging, sometimes fatal, diseases of their parents’ childhoods. Thus they were spared.

norinedresser.org

celebrations, customs/rituals, health, parties

Bob Dylan Was Right: The Times They Are a-Changin’

And Here’s the Reason Why – The Covid-19 Virus

I purchased this Covid-19 piñata from a piñata and popsicle shop here in Las Cruces, NM. Since no face-to-face parties are safe during the pandemic, I am hoping to smash it in October 2021, at my 90th birthday party. Hopefully, by then we will have a safe vaccine available. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2021.
I purchased this Covid-19 piñata at a piñata and popsicle shop in Las Cruces, NM. Since face-to-face celebrations are unsafe during this pandemic year, I am hoping to smash it in October, 2021 at my 90th birthday party. Hopefully, by then we will have a safe vaccine available. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

During this 2020 Pandemic we are sheltering in place and keeping our social distances, but leading a sedentary lifestyle brings changes:

       We are gaining weight;

       Our pets are gaining weight;

       Bra sales are down;

       High heel sales are down by 70%;

       Pajamas and lounge wear sales are up;

       Lipstick sales are down (it smears inside a mask);

       Eye makeup sales are up;

      Single folks who are dating now concern themselves with, “What mask shall I wear?”

Since going to movies and dining inside restaurants is limited, we must content ourselves with home-based entertainment. Thus we are transported to places all over the world via TV streaming or ZOOM activities on our computers. I do both.

Last week, I visited the moon with NASA and saw close-ups of its peaks and craters. I’ve gone bird watching in Utah with the Audubon Society; I went on a pilgrimage with the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California to Yosemite to learn about the role of the Chinese as trail cooks and laundry workers in the National Parks;  In the Catskills, I listened to a band composed of Irving Berlin’s great-grandchildren playing great-grandpa’s tunes; I attended the Roswell, NM Jazz Festival to learn about the music of Duke Ellington; I toured three ghost towns in New Mexico; I wept at three different funerals: Catholic, Buddhist, Jewish.

I’ve ZOOMED to the Fowler Museum at UCLA for two Learn and Lunch sessions, one on Voudun flags from Haiti, the other on elaborate headdresses from Sierra Leone. I traveled to the Museum of the Jewish People in Tel Aviv; In Cuba, I enjoyed the music of an outstanding female trio, the Vocal Vidas, and I learned about St. Joseph Tables from the Italian American Museum on Olvera Street. In New York, I celebrated Stephen Sondheim’s 90th birthday party, where Broadway singers belted out his tunes. I’ve visited book clubs, meetings of the Las Cruces Press Women, and weekly gatherings of the Las Cruces Ukes. Once you start exploring online, the opportunities are endless. 

Despite ZOOM transporting us all over the globe for stimulating events, they can’t replace the experience of being with real people. That rarity happened when I attended a drive-through Jewish ceremony for Ephraim Schmukler’s first haircut, called an Upshearin. Ephraim is the three-year-old son of Rabbi Bery and Chenchie Schmukler, co-directors of the Alevy Chabad Jewish Center of Southern New Mexico. In addition to a boy’s first haircut at age three, the boy also accepts his responsibility to begin studying the Torah. 

Ephraim Schmukler, three-years-old, sitting under an archway of balloons before his hair-cutting ceremony. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

Several years prior, I attended the Upshearin of Ephraim’s older brother, Ari. At that time, the number of party goers numbered about fifty, held indoors with fabulous decorations and food prepared by his talented mother. The highlight was having every person step up to cut off one lock of the boy’s hair, in exchange for a donation to charity.

At the drive-through Upshearin, we received a packet of goodies, including cookies that were the birthday boy’s favorites. Then as we drove out, an attendant gave each of us a sno-cone to offset the oppressive desert heat of that day.

Las Cruces’ Tropical Shaved Kona Ice truck provided much-needed respite from the desert heat. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

Since I arrived at the tail-end of the event, Ephraim’s mom invited me out of my car to snip a lock of her young son’s hair. Actually touching this child’s soft silky curls was startling. When was the last time I touched a baby’s hair? This simple gesture reminded me of how much we have lost during this pandemic beyond those who have perished.

Norine, the Barber. What an honor to touch and cut this sweet baby’s hair. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

We crave human contact. We need hugs and human touch, actions that ZOOM cannot provide. Alas, we must wait until such time when human interactions are safe. In the meanwhile, I guess I’ll just have to content myself with hugging my cat for the twenty seconds per day she allots me.

Norine Dresser is a folklorist who has taken sheltering-in-place as a mandate.

norinedresser.org

Visit her Gallery of Folklore & Popular Culture: flpcgallery.org

customs/rituals, folklore, health

Quackery

Phrenology: While not an exact example of quackery, this was a bogus method of diagnosing human behavior popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. By examining the shape and unevenness of a head or skull, one could discover the organs responsible for different intellectual aptitudes and character traits using the above skull map. Photo by Mariah Chase. ©Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

 

JIM BAKKER SUED BY SECOND STATE FOR SELLING FAKE CORONAVIRUS CURE screamed the headline sourced by CBS News. Both Missouri and Arkansas claimed that Bakker and his Morningside Church Productions bilked consumers out of over $120,00 for colloidal silver, a product sold on the internet as a dietary supplement. However, ingesting this substance is toxic and can cause Argyria that can permanently turn the skin a bluish-grey. Regardless, Bakker advertised that his Silver Solution totally eliminated the virus, killed it, deactivated it.

According to Lydia Kang, M.D., and Nate Pedersen, co-authors of  Quackery: A Brief History of the Worst Ways to Cure Everything (New York: Workman, 2017), purveyors of sham cures prey on our fears of death or sickness. They hawk substances that don’t work, that hurt and even kill us. Sometimes the sellers truly believe their potions are effective; more frequently, they are being deceptive with intent to cash in on a catastrophe.

The COVID-19 pandemic offers a perfect opportunity for charlatans to take advantage of our anxiety about this invisible killer. An online Newsweek headline reads: Coronavirus Quack Cures Like Cow Urine, Fasting and Cognac Are Being Promoted by Authority Figures Around the World.

In Kenya, Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko promoted drinking cognac as an antidote for the disease. Elsewhere in India, party agendas included the drinking of cow urine as a cure for the virus. As absurd as that may seem, in the past, U.S. physicians touted ingesting  Premarin to reduce hot flashes of menopausal women. And how is Premarin made? From the urine of pregnant horses.

President Trump got into the action when he suggested injecting household disinfectant  as a possible cure for the Covid-19 Virus along with internally using ultra-violet light. The scientific world metaphorically groaned. (Isn’t that when Dr. Fauci covered his face?) Not only were these cures invalid but could lead to death. His pseudo-remedies inspired many Facebook jokes and satires. For example, Randy Rainbow, popular online parodist, wrote and sang: “Just a spoonful of Clorox makes your temperature go down….”

The WHO was not amused claiming that drinking anything with bleach in it can cause severe vomiting, severe diarrhea, life-threatening low blood pressure caused by dehydration and acute liver failure. A less toxic treatment in China caused some people to hold exactly seven peppercorns under their tongues to ward off the COVID-19.

Fortunately, there is a dependable online source called “Quackwatch.org” run by a Dr. Stephen Barrett. He calls it “Your Guide to Quackery, Health, Fraud, and Intelligent Decisions.” And he has been a good health crusader for over two decades.

Barrett posts numerous categories of COVID-19 scams including: Prevention (phony dietary supplements that boost immune systems); Testing (fake at-home kits, door-to-door sales people); Mask Exemption cards (no such things); Treatments (fake cures); Supply (phony salespeople who take your money and run).

These are scary times being surrounded by an unseen foe. The danger cannot be understated. Personally, two of my friends got the virus, but only one survived. In Sunset Park, Brooklyn, two dozen refrigerated trucks currently hold over 1,300 frozen victims awaiting burial. The bodies remain in limbo while families decide how they want their loved ones buried or come up with the money to pay for funerals.

Be careful. Discuss your concerns and plans of action with medical personnel, and observe recommendations for masks, avoiding crowds, and social distancing. To use an old maxim, Better Safe than Sorry.

                                                                   ###

Norine Dresser is a folklorist who takes the Shelter-in-Place recommendation seriously. The evidence? Check out her now long and greying hair.

Website: norinedresser.org

Gallery of Folklore & Popular Culture: flpcgallery.org

 

 

 

Cultural differences, customs/rituals, health, hygiene

Bottom’s Up!

 

Coveted roll of toilet paper during the Covid-19 Pandemic. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

 

What’s with all the toilet paper hoarding here in the U.S.? Does it seem strange to you? Truthfully, tell me how many rolls do you have in reserve?

Toilet paper has become such a treasured item, that when my Passover Seder meal was delivered from the Alevy Chabad Jewish Center here in Las Cruces, they also brought a cellophane-wrapped TP roll as a bonus.

I can’t say for sure, but in my memory when I was a child I used an outhouse while staying at my paternal grandparents’ cabin near Carbon Canyon in Southern California. I can’t remember what we used to clean ourselves afterward, but in stories and in films it seemed that it was either magazine or newspaper pages.

Sharon Hudgins, in a letter to the New Yorker, recalls teaching in post-Soviet Russian during the 1990s. At her university, there was no toilet paper at all. Instead they used pages from old textbooks on Marxism-Leninism.

I’ve read numerous articles about why we hoard toilet paper, and the one that resonates most with me is that we are attempting to exert control over our lives at a time when deadly circumstances are beyond our control.

Much of our TP panic is culturally motivated. There are other parts of the world where toilet paper is not the preferred method of cleaning one’s bum.

Multi-functional watering can for those who prefer water for after- toilet cleansing.  © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2020.

 

While living in Southern California, I used to visit some Iranian Muslim friends. I noted a watering can in each bathroom. They informed me that in Iran, most homes had bidets because they believe that water is the most hygienic way to clean one’s self. Since most American bathrooms lack bidets, having a watering can nearby can simulate the effect.

Water is the preferred cleansing method in many parts of Asia, India, Islamic Middle East, and Europe. In Italy, in 1975, a hygiene law stated: “For each accommodation, at least one bathroom must be equipped with the following sanitary facilities: toilet, bidet, bath or shower, washbasin.

During this pandemic crisis, some Americans have reconsidered that if they had bidets, they wouldn’t have to depend so much on toilet paper.

According to an article in the Guardian, if Americans gave up toilet paper, they could keep 15m trees from being turned into pulp every year. Manufacturing a roll of toilet paper requires 37 gallons a roll. Bidets save both trees and water, using only one-eighth a gallon per flush.

Jason Ojalvo, CEO of Tushy, a bidet company founded in 2015, claims that in the first week of March, 2020, sales doubled, then two days later sales tripled; then it was 10 times the normal sales. A few days after that, business peaked at a million-dollar sales per day.

Visitors to Japan marvel at their toilets. They have heated seats; posterior and front washes; adjustable water temperature; nozzle sterilization; adjustable water pressure; air deodorizer; white noise, even classical music to mask natural sounds; automatic lids and seats that lift up and down; with additional features of self-flushing; self-cleaning; warm dry air or air conditioning for hot days.

The newest trend has a small water basin located on top of the tank cover. After toileting, people wash their hands, then flush the used water from the basin that then drains into the tank and into the bowl.

 

Before flushing, user washes hands in basin attached to water tank.

 

So how much will one of these fancy toilets cost? Fifty K more or less. I’m afraid that’s not within my budget, but I can dream, can’t I?

 

Norine Dresser is a folklorist who would love to have one of those fancy Japanese toilets.

 

norinedresser.org

 

able/disabled, aging, disabilities, health, pets

Pain, Poop, and Patience/Patients

I never dreamed while contemplating my reverse right shoulder replacement that I would actually have a good time during the process. That never happened after previous surgeries. I’ve had my gall bladder removed; back surgery; both hips and my left shoulder replaced, yet nary one laugh escaped me during those ordeals.

 

I tried to focus on the outcome of the procedure rather than the process. Does Dr. Sawbones refer to the method of removing the old shoulder parts? OUCH!

Several days after this surgery they transferred me to a brand new rehab center. I should have suspected an unusual environment when the head nurse introduced herself as, “Nurse Anthrax,” (not her real name but one equally toxic). I was incredulous at the naiveté of her parents for giving her such a moniker. That set me off on a scavenger hunt of other ironies, such as entering the physical therapy room and noticing that they were playing “Masonic Funeral Music.”

One day, my heart skipped a beat when I saw Fritz standing in the doorway. His neatly trimmed grey beard and hair reminded me of my late husband. Imagine my excitement when he sat down on the bed, his body touching mine. I wished that he would kiss me. Instead, he turned away and eagerly kissed my red-headed woman visitor. This aroused my jealousy, but then suddenly he disappeared. Could I hold a grudge against him?  No! I knew that next Tuesday, Fritz the Schnauzer therapy dog would visit me again.

 

Stand-in for Fritz the Therapy Dog.

When you look around the dining area, superficially all you see are old bodies in wheelchairs, some with oxygen cannulas in their noses, others with drains coming from their kidneys, or those with broken limbs in splints. It’s so easy to discount these wounded folks. But that would be  a big mistake. Many of them had led adventurous lives and had had marvelous careers.

Once I opened myself up to their stories, I was constantly stimulated and amazed. I learned the gory details about a husband who dumped his wife for a much younger woman he met on a Greek Island; Wynona entertained me with descriptions of being in Tehran just before the Shah left and the Iranian Revolution began. Nursing attendants told tales of being abused by ex-mates; or about the suspicions single dads encounter when they accompany their teenage daughters to buy underwear. And do you know the difference in the way male attendants give showers compared to female attendants? Mine washed me like he was washing his car, spraying first down one side of me. Then I turned and he washed down the other side. I took care of my own headlights.

One dinner hour I said to my tablemates, “Aren’t the nights long here?” To my  amazement, one ordinarily quiet woman began reciting lines from “Macbeth.” Then she told me about attending Yale and her life’s work as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner and nursing instructor.

I met the son of a patient who’s a retired probation officer.  Guess what he does in his retirement? He collects and repairs fountain pens. He has written articles about his collection and even had an exhibit of them in nearby Alamogordo. This was a folklorist’s delight.

Sometimes snippets of conversation captured me:

I miss my dog more than my husband;

I married a Roman Catholic priest;

If you leave off your brassiere, your wrinkles disappear;

My dog knows how to spell D-O-G-P-A-R-K.

Food services were excellent and unique for such an institutional setting. For example, one time they served eggs benedict for breakfast; chicken Alfredo over fettuccini for lunch; stir-fry steak and veggies and rice for dinner. And there was an alternative menu available for all three meals.

I met Angelica Wagner, also a patient at the rehab center. She teaches cooking and does catering when not recovering from surgery. As a special occupational therapy exercise, she taught us how to make cherry-filled empanadas. The following week we made mini-cinnamon rolls. This was a very enlightened healing environment.

 

Angelica Wagner teaching Occupational Therapy patients how to make empanadas. Step one, cutting out the dough. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2019.

Finished product. Notice fork for using tines to seal the empanada.© Norine Dresser Photo Collection, 2019.

Putting cherry filling inside dough circles. © Norine Dresser Photo Collection, 2019

 

 

 

 

Still patients complained:

“Can you believe they call this bean soup. The beans aren’t even white?” (I had a cynical hunch that her attitude applied to people, as well.)

“You know, I have to hit the TV remote button FIVE times before it will change channels.”

Overcoming pain and getting the digestive system back to normal after anesthesia and medications are the two most difficult post-op tasks.  It takes patience to be a good patient, something that I lack. Nonetheless, social interactions go a long way in helping rehabilitation. From the many colorful get-well cards to my many visitors, two laden with Stroopwaffel McFlurries, and to my almost-daily visits from Damien, a Papillion, and his driver Carol Witham, fellow patients and staff with their intriguing stories contributed toward my recovery. After almost a full month at the rehab center, I eagerly returned home and with thanks to all of you.

 

Damien, a frequent visitor who always brought me cheer. © Norine Dresser photo collection, 2019.

Oops! I forgot to mention something. While I was away I had Liza Chase take care of my cat’s meals in the morning and Roxana Gillette gave Sweetie Beattie the night feeding. Liza left the TV on for the cat 24/7 so she wouldn’t feel alone in the empty house. Often Liza turned on the History Channel. However, one day as she was leaving, the History Channel was airing a show about Hitler. Liza thought that was inappropriate for a Jewish household, so she changed the channel to one about Aliens.

 

 

Norine Dresser is a folklorist who is relieved that the surgery is now in the past, and she is home at last with Sweetie Beattie.

Visit the Gallery of Folklore and Popular Culture: flpcgallery.org